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Trash Can Turkey

trashcan turkey, pheasant phantazmagoria 021Preface:  My enthusiasm was greatly deflated when, on a whim, I checked the internet on the off -chance that someone in the blogosphere had also had the mind-blowing experience of preparing a turkey without the use of electricity or a bbq pit.

I discovered, much to my dismay, that apparently every other person in the civilized world not only prepares trash can turkeys on a fairly regular basis, but writes up their experiences and findings on their blogs.

However,I refuse to be daunted by this newly discovered revelation.  Keep in mind my innocent enthusiasm as you read my thoughts… and know that I’ll try to get out more.

I’ve just gotta say that this is the coolest idea I’ve seen in a long time.  It’s the perfect solution for preparing a holiday feast without the use of a conventional oven.  Imagine a power outage, Thanksgiving at the hunting camp (as in this case), or perhaps having the family over during a zombie apocalypse. This brilliant idea allows a deerslayer’s wife to come through in the face of disaster or just impress the pants off everyone, gaining the admiration and awe of all.  Many thanks to my dear friend, Christine DeBolt for sharing the idea.

Trash Can Turkey

a 10-12 pound turkey

brining and/or injecting ingredients of your choice

extra wide, heavy-duty foil

a pointed, wooden stake about 24 inches in length and at least 1″x1″

enough rocks or bricks to hold the foil down

a small, galvanized steel trash can or ash bin

10 pounds of charcoal

a shovel

1. Prepare your turkey.  You can brine it, inject it, or just season it the way you prefer.

This turkey was brined and injected with Cajun Injector Hickory Grill Seasoning (from Academy Sporting Goods).  While the turkey rests, set up your outdoor cooking area.

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Either in a pit or on a grass-free area of dirt near where you will set up your cooking area, start 10 pounds of charcoal.

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Lay and overlap foil in about a three foot square on a relatively flat area that has enough soft soil to pound the wooden stake into the center.

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Place rocks or bricks around the perimeter.

Pound wooden stake into the center of the square.  It needs to go about 4 or 5 inches deep.

Wrap stake with foil. “Insert” turkey onto the stake thusly.

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Make sure the turkey is comfortable!

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Place inverted trash can over the turkey.

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 Shovel white coals around the outside edge of the trash can and on top.

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After about an hour and a half, the turkey should be ready to eat. Carefully use the shovel to pull the coals from around the trash can and from the top.

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Using heavy gloves, lift the trash can and check the turkey. The meat should be starting to fall from the bones.

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The meat literally was falling off the bone!  Once again, excuse my excitement.   Not to be outdone by everyone in the civilized world, I want to try this method on a wild turkey and maybe a goose, adjusting the times based on the size and leanness of the meat.  Wish me luck.

 

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Turkeys!

 

When we purchased our hunting property a year ago, we hoped that there would be enough game to meet our needs.  That translates to “fill our freezers”.  The place had been over-hunted for sure.  But it was a decent size for us, was easy to get around on, and was covered with ancient oak trees with enough mesquite to flavor all our smoked meat.  It was a beautiful piece of land and it was ours.

This past spring, we heard some turkeys off in the distance one evening.  We weren’t even certain they were on our property.  Sure enough, while walking around the next morning, we spooked one right in front of our little casita.  Immediately, we discovered that she had been sitting on a nest of eleven eggs!

Apparently, we were gonna have our very own flock of turkeys!  Images of Thanksgiving turkey and dressing, turkey pot pie, trash can turkey, and  turkey stock to make turkey soup (I use my pheasant soup recipe.) filled my head.  I was ready to make room in the freezer for some turkey.

Several months passed before we had another chance to get to the ranch.  Fast forward to September and October. We had feared that the eggs might have fallen prey to a pair of foxes that resided nearby. It was time to start getting ready for hunting season.  We headed up ready to get to work.  While driving around the property,  I spotted a flock meandering around in the shade of the oak trees.  It appeared that most if not all of the eggs had hatched.  I was so excited.

It’s kinda funny.  I don’t really have any helpful hints or recipes for this post.   I just wanted to share something that brought me so much joy and made me so happy.  Not too many years ago, I wouldn’t have been caught dead driving around a ranch in a pickup truck.  Or spent days cleaning mouse poop out of a very rustic hunting cabin.  I was content to send my husband off hunting while I shopped and, well, didn’t go hunting.  I’m not really sure what changed. Now, I can’t think of any place I’d rather be than on that ranch, listening for turkeys.

I have much to be thankful for.

 

 

 

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Our Own Ranch

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I think that it’s a dream of just about every hunter to have a place of his own… not a hunting lease but a hunk of land that belongs to him to hunt as he pleases, to wander around on, look at the stars at night, watch the sun rise and set, knowing that every corner and everything in between is his.

It’s been a dream of ours for years; having a place to hunt that is our very own, not a lease. It’s a dream that has finally been realized!  Deerslayer and I are now the proud owners of our own 256 acre hunting ranch in the Texas Hill Country! I don’t think I can put into words my excitement.

The process of finding the place was difficult, frustrating, and exhausting but it was worth it.  For years, we’ve added to and adjusted our wish list.  Our “dream ranch” :

  • has to be in the Texas Hill Country
  • has to have at least 200 acres
  • has to have access to highway and city
  • has to have power and a well
  • has to be easily traversed
  • has to have lots of oak trees
  • has to have a view of sunsets and sunrises

After more than a year of searching in earnest, we found a place within our budget and negotiated until we agreed on a price.  Our ranch (I just love saying “our ranch”) is about two hours away from San Antonio with it’s medical center, shopping and international airport.  There are smaller towns within 30 minutes to an hour away that have grocery stores, hardware stores, a church, etc. that we will need access to.

There’s a casita on the place that will take some fixing up. Since we bought the place “as is”, there’s lots of trash that will need to be hauled away.  There’s also a trashed camper on the place that, luckily, the realtor will be removing. We’ve taken our own camper out there which will allow us to work at our own pace until things are taken care of to our satisfaction. It will certainly be a labor of love. Heavy on the labor.dsc_0233

We’ve brewed coffee and watched the sun rise over the ridge.  We’ve seen axis deer and flushed coveys of quail.  We’ve heard turkeys.  We’ve watched the sun set, sat around a fire and gazed at the stars ON OUR OWN RANCH.

wp-image-1004744136jpg.jpg2017 is going to be a great year. I can’t wait to share it with you.

 
 

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What Makes a Mother Proud (A Hunting Mindset)

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My baby made these shots from 100 yards with her Browning Micro Medallion .308.

There are so many things that make moms proud of their little ones.  It starts with ultrasound pictures before the little guys are even born.  Then come all the “firsts”; first solid food, first steps, first words, first successful potty visit.  As time goes by, first scrawled pictures, first book read, first awards in school take the place of previous achievements.

The household of a deerslayer family takes this a step further.  First rifle, first buck, first pig, first field dressing are held in high esteem among members of the family and extended family.  Even I, as a former educator, have to admit that I was very pleased when my two junior deerslayers each harvested a doe this year. We’ve had plenty of trophies over the years but the tender, delicious meat from a whitetail doe can’t be beat in my book  The elder junior deerslayer skinned and gutted hers with minimal assistance and the younger watched carefully and learned as Dad proceeded to field dress hers.

trashcan turkey, pheasant phantazmagoria 039In the Deerslayer clan, being a National Merit Scholarship winner and valedictorian paled in comparison to getting one’s first buck. Early on, I was stymied by the mindset. As I’ve adopted the hunting ways, and grown in years and wisdom, I think I finally understand. Academic knowledge is wonderful and opens many doors in life. In the grand scheme of things, though, being able to sit around a campfire with family and friends, building and nurturing those relationships that will truly be lifelong, while providing healthy, lean, hormone- and antibiotic-free meat for one’s family is truly something to be proud of.

 

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Save Those Wild Pork Shanks!

smoked pork shank, rum cake, tamales, dance, christmas 001Attention, all Pigslayers! Don’t throw away those wild pork shanks.  I know, they don’t seem to have enough meat on them to count for much. But don’t be swayed.  While on our Thanksgiving hunting trip, Deerslayer smoked our turkey and a whole pan of pork shanks that I’d saved from a previous hunt.They turned out beautifully. Smoky,delicious goodness!   I packaged up the smoked shanks, about four per bag, and froze them.  When I decided to cook up a big pot of beans, I threw two shanks into the works and simmered everything until the delicious, smoked meat fell from the bone.  A masterpiece!

What excites me the most about this shanky revelation is that it provides an additional use for meat that has been, in the past, relegated to the trashcan. So cook good meat, ALL the meat and feed it to your family!

 
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Posted by on January 1, 2014 in Uncategorized

 
 
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